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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)
's the smallest business on main street or the largest economy in the world. so what we need to do is get to the point of dealing with the biggest deficit this country faces the jobs deficit. and to me this bill simply put a band aid on the problem. it did do something the president wanted to do, committed to do. he delivered on the promise to try to help protect the middle class but my fear is that in these next 3 -- three political maneuvers we're going to see that people will start attacking the middle class and i believe that this was our best opportunity to really take care long term the issues that we need to address to a balanced approach. >> so to follow up, you voted early, i was watching the board. you voted early. you didn't vote to see if it was going to pass and then vote no. was the idea that obama kind of lost some leverage there that you wanted to see it fail because obama now has to go back to the debt ceiling and he doesn't have the benefit of tax cuts looming? >> i knew it was going to pass. after the republicans walked away from the negotiations and then tried to plan
the entire economy. that is not how historically this has been done. that's not how we're going to do it this time. what i'm saying to you is there is no simpler solution, no ready, credible solution other than congress either give me the authority to raise the debt ceiling or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling because this is about paying your bills. everybody -- everybody here understands this. i mean, this is not a complicated concept. you don't go out to dinner and eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you're breaking the law. congress should think about it the same way that the american people do. now, if congress wants to have a debate about maybe we shouldn't go out to dinner next time, maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. that's a debate that we should have. but you don't say in order for me to control my appetites, i'm going to not pay the people who already provided me services. it's not meeting your obligations. you can't do that. that's not a credible way to run th
to carry out the agenda i campaigned on. new security for the middle class. right now our economy is growing and our businesses are creating new jobs. we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions in sound investments, and as long as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago
to protect the economy. i personally believe the presidents that responsibility to protect the economy. and he can't mess around with these republicans who are threatening not to pay the bills of the country. we're not talking about spending. we're talking about paying bills that -- money that has already been spent that we're obligated to pay. there would be a ripple effect globally that would be insurmountable if we don't go down the road of paying the bills. i think the president has to draw the line there and be strong. he's got the people with him. that's the other thing. i think it's important that we focus on that. >> certainly political capital spent from getting re-elected to a second term. gregory, i want to show everybody the letter that ed mentioned that was sent to president obama on friday. in part saying, we believe you must be willing to take any lawful steps to ensure that america does not blake its promises and trigger a global economic crisis. without congressional approval, if necessary. basically recommending the 14th amendment. >> i think two important points here
on the need to reduce the deficit in a balanced way that will help the economy grow, amongst democrats on the hill, and, a few republicans, the barrier to progress here is not the president. we need to see more republicans and congress -- in congress willing to compromise, even on revenues. >> chris: they say they need to see the president willing to compromise on spending cuts and entitlement reform. >> let's look at what we offered speaker boehner. it is public. $400 billion in health care savings we offered, and $200 billion of additional cuts in domestic spending and a trillion dollars in savings and look at where we started the negotiated process and the speaker, we went more than halfway. >> chris: is the president still willing to adjust the cost of living increase for entitlements, is he still willing to raise the eligibility age for medicare? are those still on the table? >> i will not talk about specifics that may be in the package. it is will report in the discussions with speaker boehner we were willing to entertain the cost of living adjustment. but, the overall package, w
of our economy still smoldering and unstable, i asked him to help me put it back together. thanks in large part to his steady hand, our economy has been growing, our businesses have created nearly 6 million new jobs, the money we spend to save the financial system has largely been paid back. we put in place rules to prevent that kind of meltdown from ever happening again. the auto industry was saved. we major taxpayers are not on the hook if the biggest firms fail again. we have taken steps to help underwater homeowners come up for air and open new markets to sell american goods overseas. we have begun to reduce our deficit through a balanced mix of spending cuts and reforms to a tax code that at the time when we both came in was skewed in favor of the wealthy at the expense of middle class americans. when the history books are written, tim geithner is going to go down as one of our finest secretaries of the treasury. [applause] don't embarrass him. [laughter] on a personal note, he has been a wonderful friend and dependable advisor the out these last four years. there is an unoff
having different task force for the visa according to the economy? >> there has to be away -- a lot of our laws date back to the 1950's. some to the 1960's. there has to be a way of bringing it up to date. those are things that will have to be negotiated. all be just say it can't managed by a central system in washington where washington decides how many nurses we need, how many farm workers. business will have to play a role and business will have to be the determining factor in order to make this work in a practical way. >> think for a man and that 10,000 people a day retire in the united states, seven days a week. we are a nation with unemployment and with a shortage of people that go to work at specific jobs. the secretary's point is on target. if you try to do this with an overseer of exactly how many left-handed nurses and right- handed carpenters get into the added states, we are doing the wrong thing. we need to do it on demand. if we have an extraordinary need to be competitive, and many, because of the price of energy and the fact the country is probably will have and have
debt ceiling. >> it would be a self inflicted wound on the economy, it would slow down our growth. might tip us in to recession. and ironically, would probably increase our deficit. so to even entertain the idea of this happening, of the united states of america not paying its bills, is irresponsible. it's absurd. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> thank goodness. but next, news flash, we already hit the ceiling two weeks ago. and the treasury's been using, quote, extraordinary measures to pay its bills. what does that even mean? the money shuffle can't last forever. the u.s. is out of money to pay its bills, it's already spent in less than four weeks. i have cousins that do that. they play to hold the debt ceiling hostage. aides say half the conference is ready to let the nation default. speaker boehner will school them on the real threat later this week. even a temporary extension for, say, two or three months could rattle the markets and threaten the nation's credit rating. last time they hashled out a debt deal? summer of 2011 and we ended up more than a trillion dollars in mand
the world as we continue. stay with us. lou: the obama economy in tonight's "chalk talk" we take a look at the obama economic failure. anti-gun advocate started as seven democrat, and day distort his campaign ad. he supports the second amendment steven haze of the weekly standard, a former bush special assistant to next. ♪ the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her likes 50% more cash, but i have an idea. do you want a princess dress? yes. cupcakes? yes. do you want an etch-a-sketch? yes! do you want 50% more cash? no. you got talent. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? i usually say that. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clien
the economy. >> we talk to white house strategist david plouffe and our powerhouse roundtable, abc's george will, matthew dowd and cokie roberts plus former michigan governor, jennifer granholm, for the democrats and former presidential candidate rick santorum for the republicans. ♪ plus, how will the inaugural set the tone for the second term? we ask the star co-chairing the president's committee. eva longoria joins us live. >>> hello again, and welcome to inauguration day. it is, in fact, today. the constitution says a president's term ends at noon on january 20th, and the official proceedings have already begun. just moments ago, vice president biden took the oath at the naval observatory. supreme court justice sonia sotomayor swearing him in and just before noon chief justice john roberts will swear in president obama, a small private ceremony at the white house in advance of tomorrow's public event. about 800,000 expected right there at the national mall tomorrow far fewer than turned out four years ago for the first inaugural for president obama even everything just about set on the
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
for new jobs, new opportunities and new security for the middle class. right now, our economy is growing. and our businesses are creating new jobs. so, we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions and sound investments. and as long as washington politics don't get in the way of america's progress. as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunities for the middle class is shrinking deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decades. which would stabilize our debt and deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy but it would make it manageable so that it does not crowd out the investments we need to make in people, education, job training, science, medical research. step by step, we made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i have signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two w
tomorrow? >> there's atmospheric differences. we had an economy collapsing all around us and he was a first term president and still putting together his team and agenda and cabinet and still the economy is too weak but recovering and the question is right now building on that as opposed to simply trying to stem the bleeding. there's a big difference and i think the experience of the office, as you know, you know, that helps a lot and so i think he does have even more sure-footedness in his approach. >> it can become a bit of a burden. historians write about the second term curse and i know you and your team spent a lot of time studying how to avoid that. what's the key? >> well, i think, listen, if you look at president clinton's second term, he made significant progress on balanced budgets and ronald reagan accomplished tax reforms. >> even if they're dealing with other problems. >> and we have been fortunate to be scandal-free and we want to continue that, but if you look, it's not like we're roaming around the west wing looking for things to do. right now in front of congress and the co
these states have the same epiphany or the same realization that there's only way to get the local economies going and that would be to change their taxes? >> well, i would tell you, charles, we have all looked at the economy that we're competing in, which is worldwide, and we know we need to be more tax competitive. i want to create more jobs in this state, our state, for citizens and higher paying jobs and the way to do that is to have lower income tax rates and corporate rates and in our particular case, i'm proposing the complete elimination of the income tax and the corporate tax rate. we do that by repealing some of the sales tax exemptions that we've granted over the years, we need a modern, simpler and fairer tax code. charles: i'm going to get to the fair issue in a moment, governor. but the basic premise that somehow this will spark the economy, obviously everyone doesn't believe that or that would be the program now. why would someone in your state who is worried about this, how do you convince him that this will indeed help the overall economy? >> well, i'm going to talk to him a
is up 5,550 points since then, just shy of the 14,000 mark. the economy is growing. instead of contracting. in the first quarter of 2009, the gdp contracted 5.3%. it grew 3.1% when the last time it was officially measured. though remains below where it was before the great recession, consumer confidence has nearly doubled. and a larger percentage of americans, 41%, according to our last poll, believe the country is headed in the right direction, up from 26% in january, 2009. on the other hand, there is plenty of data to support the idea that the drink country is not better off than it was four years ago. and that the struggling economy continues to take a toll on families. median household income is lower than it was in 2009. and 46 million americans live below the poverty line. several million more than four years ago. the federal public debt has increased from 10.6 trillion in january 2009 to 16.4 trillion now. then there's the big number that's exactly the same as it was four years ago. the unemployment rate. 7.8%. though it's down from, of course, a high of 10% in octobe
of its politics and economics and society, mexico has the 13th largest economy in the world today. $1.16 trillion. the oecd predicts in 2042, when regeneration, mexico will have his archer economy than germany's. this is not me. this is the oecd project enough things being equal. therefore notwithstanding the inequality that exists in mexico that has to be dealt with and will be dealt with over time, the fact of the matter is that texaco socially is becoming more and more middle-class society and that is reflect to and every one of the usual measures. demographically, lifestyle, in terms of fertility rate, number of students in university, quality of the housing. all of these trends have brought mexico to the point where it is becoming predominately of middle-class society and will continue to move in that direction. and third, mexico lyrically speaking is a functioning democracy. not perfect, nor is our democracy perfect. but when you look at their electoral system, if you look at the way in which freedom of the press has been moved into mexico with passion, he began to see the devel
there was a federal government shut down and they butted heads and the economy survived. when we had the debate over the debt ceiling that led to the downgrade. they are two different fights and the republicans might be willing to fight on another one. there won't be as big of a risk short-term to the u.s. economy. >> thank you very much. a great pleasure having you on. former governor mark sanford said he is scared to death and calls himself a wounded warrior. but he said he is ready for a political come back to fight the scandalous affair that ruined his marriage and career. we will tell you more about his plans coming up. zero dark 30 director is answering critics who slammed her for including torture scenes in the movie. something we thought you should know. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex offi
. at the announcement, the president and outgoing treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> our economy is better positioned for tomorrow than most of those other countries hit by the financial crisis. the tough decisions tim made and carried out deserve a lot of credit for that. i understand that tim is ready for a break. obviously, we are sad to see him go, but i cannot think of a better person to continue tim 's work at treasury than jack lew. >> unlike most treasury secretaries, jack lew earn his stripes and a washington and not wall street. he worked for tip o'neill in the 1970's and 1980's, and was clinton's: the director in the 1990's. evan, what does this tell us about the physical fights ahead? >> the good news is that he knows washington bit bad news is that he will do exactly what obama tells him, and from all indications, obama will not do much about fiscal restraint. >> nina, your sense of jack lew and what lies ahead? >> i think i agree with evan, but lew really does know the budget numbers. he did this in the clinton administration when we had a surplus, as the white house points o
attached to it. >> heather: let's talk about the economy. the president starts his new term. less than 1% rate it as excellent. 9% say it's good shape. that is up a touch from his first inauguration but 91% of voters say economic conditions negatively today. why are we here again? >> you have to wonder. i point you back to november the conditions haven't changed all that much in two months. i would imagine that those exact numbers were the same on election day, and the american people not only re-elected the president but gave us the same senate in the house as we had before. so as much as they are saying economy isn't going well, when they had an opportunity to change things they voted for more of the same. >> heather: you mentioned congress, finally two polls dealing with that. first since president obama was re-elected, 30% think he has been more bipartisan in working with congressional republicans, 55% the majority says he has been more confrontational? >> i think some of the number for confrontational they are saying that as a positive. certainly democrats want him to be more confro
're threatening to tank the united states economy. again, the debt ceiling, it is really important that people understand, this is not about expanding your capacity to start new government programs. this is paying for bill that is are already due and owing so not paying it would be like, tamron, you and i buying stuff on the credit card and then deciding after we bought that stuff we are not going to pay for it. if the united states does that, it will tank our credit rating and economy and make any discussion of what would happen going over the fiscal cliff look like child's play. that's why the president said, look, he is not going to allow the american economy to be held hostage in that way. he is absolutely prepared to continue to negotiate ways to reduce our budget deficit and that's exactly what we should be doing but we shouldn't be doing it under the threat, the republican threat, of tanking the economy by undermining the full faith and credit of the united states government. we have never done that in the history of this republic and we shouldn't start doing it now. >> all right. congr
president obama took office four years ago, the economy was getting smaller. now it is growing. nbc's first read team tries to answer the question -- are we better off now than we were four years ago? they answer it with numbers and not just, you know, gut reaction to things. the numbers. >>> and happy birthday to the first lady and that by the way is just one of the things we thought you should know. hey sis, it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the clear choice. >>> welcome back. as we gear up for the president's second inauguration, are we better off than we were four years ago? the answer depends on the stats you pick. there are plenty of numbers suggesting that the country is on more solid foot
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the economy in great detail. he does massive preparation and i think when he sits down at a table to say, do a fiscal deal one of the reasons he's able to close that deal is because, a, he has decades of experience in compromise which some of these kids today up there don't really know much about. and he understands the granularity of these issues and we saw this and it's helpful. >> vice president joe biden is going to take the oath of office for a second tomorrow right after we return from the break. ♪ ♪ pop goes the world pop in a whole new kind of clean with tide pods. a powerful 3-in-1 detergent that cleans, brightens and fights stains. pop in. stand out. but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and err
be a financial disaster, not only for our country but for the worldwide economy. i don't think it is a question that is even on the table. >> and the last question of his press conference, the president was asked if he may be more successful with some of the nuts you just heard from if he spent more quality time with them. >> you and your staff are too insular, that you don't socialize enough. >> this, of course, is one of the great myths of governing, that intractable problems, political problems, can somehow be solved over a card game and a couple of drinks. that has never, ever been the case nor will it ever be the case. >> i like speaker boehner personally. and you know, when we went out and played golf we had a great time. but that didn't get a deal done in 2011. >> the president actually had to remind the media that congressional behavior is the result of democracy. >> now if the american people feel strongly about these issues and they push hard and they reward, or don't reward members of congress with their votes, if -- you know if -- if they reject sort of uncompromising positions or s
and maybe win some election. and two, perhaps pushing wound after wound on the economy is really not what folks sent us here to do. >> and ryan, the funny thing about this, this can end up being perceived as some sort of republican cave when they never should have taken a party position against raising the debt ceiling in the first place. so that doing the rational thing could actually simply look rational when they chose to do it. >> right, exactly. they -- if they had never made a big deal about this to begin with then they wouldn't be in this situation. now, obama kind of aided and abetted them because he wanted it to be the debt ceiling leverage that he kind of wanted this grand bargain in 2011. that never happened. since then, he has been consistent saying i am not going to mess around with the debt ceiling anymore. and good for him on that, you're right. as newt gingrich said, wisely and moderately and reasonably, he said don't pick this fight because you're going to lose it. don't create a national crisis around this that will only wind up with you caving. so just do it quietly, ea
the american economy. the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> and the debate over guns, one month after 26 children and adults were killed in newtown, and with the nra saying assault weapon ban would not pass congress, the president urged house members to, quote, examine their own conscience. >> the belief that we have to have stronger background checks, that we can do a much better job in terms of keeping these magazine clips with high capacity out of the hands of folks who shouldn't have them, an assault weapons ban that's meaningful, that those are things i continue to believe make sense. will all of them get through this congress? i don't know. >> and joining me live now, democratic congresswoman jackie spear of california, vice chair of the new gun violence task force. congresswoman, thank you so much for your time. since you are on this task force, i would like to start off with the president's comments on gun control legislation. he says later this week we'll hear more specifics, but as i mentioned, you had the nra saying that they're
the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not at bargaining chip. >> on tuesday following a meeting that took place in the west wing, president obama surmounted a huge hurdle in the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary when influential new york senator chuck schumer gave it his blessing. yesterday the president forcefully and emotionally laid out his proposals to curb gun violence and challenged americans to confront the representatives and stand up to the nra. let's listen. >> ask them what's more important, doing whatever it takes to get an "a" grade from the gun lobby that funds their campaigns or giving parents some peace of mind when they drop their child off for first grade. >> joining me is former rnc chair and machines contributor michael steele and democratic strategist bob shrum. shrummy, i have to start with you. it sounds like you got into the president's ear. i know you haven't that i know of, but he's starting to charge this campaign for the second
real time and energy making a difference, moving the economy, getting people back to work and taking care of social issues making a difference. the fact that we don't is the reason in fact that we continue to have the lowest approval ratings in the history of congress. >> yes. i want to get to that but i want to stay on guns for a second. my sense is and i read the statement your office put out for instance supporting say the assault weapons ban, and i believe you are all supportive of that right? >> yes. >> you, congressman have a district in which i don't think it will give you much grief in your re-election. you represent the great city of madison, wisconsin. but you both had very contested races. you know, sam stein wrote a great piece in the huffington post. going back and talking to members who were around in the '94 assault weapons ban who really did get blindsided by what the cost of that vote was in terms of the nra coming after them. i want to play a clip of jim moran talking about the nra's political power. take a look. >> that this is going to happen, it is going to have
between $40 million and $50 million. the economy is not sod great. a second term and inaugural speeches the second time around not as climactic as the first time. >> a small subdued party and costs in the range of $40 million you got to wonder. a lot of money when you really think about it, isn't it? thank sow so much. >> there were ten balls last time, martha. only two balls this time oh he fixly. there was a lot of party going on last night and there will be around washington in the private bashs. >> see you there latino they are afternoon. thank you so much. >> 11:55 eastern time the official swearing in ceremony for the president will take place at the white house. later tonight the president and first lady will be at the national building museum at 8:00 eastern time to participate in candle light is celebration along with the vice president joe biden and his wife jill. they will address the nation at 8:55 eastern time later tonight and then, of course, tomorrow is a big day also. you can watch that tonight and complete coverage of our inauguration event right here on the fox news c
and hatred. our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. our healthcare is too costly costly and our schools fail too many. each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet. these are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. less measurable, but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land. a nagging fear that america owes the decline is inevitable, but the next generation must lower its sights. today i say to you that the challenges we face are real. they are serious and they are many. they will not be met easily or in a short span of time, that know this, america -- they will be met. [cheers and applause] on this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of her pace over conflict and discord. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recri
. the 2013 ram 1500 with best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >>> turns out that the subway footlong is sometimes 11 inches. we have been $5 foot wronged. now we know how jared lost all that weight! he starved to death! subway, it is over. i'm going to be keeping you honest by measuring every sandwich with the most accurate means possible, my fruit by the foot. >> i don't know, lance armstrong, manti te'o, now subway sandwiches. >> who can you trust? >> my world is crushed. let's take a look at the "morning papers." "the financial times." china's economic growth has hit its slowest rate in 13 years. still the country's gdp grew by 7.8%. economists say it could have been worse. they note amid concerns of a slowdown, china's government has spurred heavy investment in inf infrastructure. >> "usa today." congress, inexperienced. 40% of lawmakers in the house have fewer than three years' experience. the lowest number since at least 1995. as a result, new members are often receiving committee as
as a proportion of our economy and that means we're bailsically stabilizing, we're going to be okay. what do you say to that. >> i hope that's true. that means that economic growth will pick up dramatically and bring tax receipts way up and it will also bring spending way down awes get people off food stamps, off welfare, off unemployment. the best form of welfare is still a high paying job. stuart: do you believe it? >> i don't think it's true right now, no, i don't think these policies will do it. stuart: not now, obviously, not. debt as a proportion of the economy keeps going up. >> it's bigger and bigger, and the deficit doesn't seem to be getting really teenie tiny either, does it stuart? >> no, just not. 3 1/2 billion extra every single day. >> i know, amazing. stuart: tell me how it actually affects our economic growth rate. how does it it do this? >> well, now, with low, low, low, low, interest rates, it doesn't increase the use of tax receipts it pay interest on the debt. but as interest rates rise, which they will, it will have an enormously deleterious effect on growth rates. it reall
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)